N-acetyl-Cysteine

N-acetyl-Cysteine

N-acetyl-Cysteine is one of the most important supplements when thinking aboutliver detoxification, hangover prevention and hangover treatments. Even having multiple drinks once a week has a powerfully damaging effect on the body, especially the liver. As the liver struggles to process the foreign ethanol, its enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase is converting the ethanol into acetaldehyde, a substance that is over ten times to thirty times more toxic than ethanol itself.

Also found in tobacco smoke, acetaldehyde is an organic compound thought to be the primary source of hangovers, is a probable carcinogen and is damaging to DNA. In industry, acetaldehyde is used in making plastics and shares a chemical relationship with formaldehydefound in enbalming fluid. And while alcohol dehydrogenase and glutathione do a good job at converting acetaldehyde to its less harmful acetic acid forelimination, pounding on the booze over a short period of time overwhelm’s the liver’s ability to create glutathione, allowing more time for theacetaldehyde to damage the liver.

This is where N-Acetyl Cysteine comes in. Part of the acetyl group with anattached nitrogen atom, N-acetyl-Cysteine is the derivative of the L-cysteine amino acid and a precursor of the Glutathione antioxidant of the thiol (sulfhydryl) group that is able to reduce free radicals. It is the mightyGlutathione that binds to rogueacetaldehyde, metabolizing the molecules to acetic acid for elimination.

As a primer to alcohol consumption, N-acetyl-Cysteine primes the body with sufficient glutathione antioxidants and helps fight off the damaging effects of ethanol as it is being consumed (though not the actual intoxication). As a hangover remedy,acetaldehyde continues to be produced in the body well after you’ve stopped drinking, and taking N-acetyl-Cysteine helps here to produce the necessary glutathione to combat the continued presence of acetaldehyde.

Benefits after abstinence include a further promotion of detoxification in the liver and as a free radical combating oxidative stress. It may further be helpful with complications such as HIV infection, cancer, heart disease, cigarette smoking,chemotherapy, cocaine addiction and dependence and is used in hospitals as an emergency antidote to acetaminophen poisoning.

Again, I’m a beer lover not a doctor, so consult your physician before starting any liver detox or treatments. Multiple readings suggest dosing N-acetyl-Cystein with a vitamin C dose three times that of N-acetyl-Cystein, so ask your doctor.

Also found in tobacco smoke, acetaldehyde is an organic compound thought to be the primary source of hangovers, is a probable carcinogen and is damaging to DNA. In industry, acetaldehyde is used in making plastics and shares a chemical relationship with formaldehydefound in enbalming fluid. And while alcohol dehydrogenase and glutathione do a good job at converting acetaldehyde to its less harmful acetic acid forelimination, pounding on the booze over a short period of time overwhelm’s the liver’s ability to create glutathione, allowing more time for theacetaldehyde to damage the liver.

This is where N-Acetyl Cysteine comes in. Part of the acetyl group with anattached nitrogen atom, N-acetyl-Cysteine is the derivative of the L-cysteine amino acid and a precursor of the Glutathione antioxidant of the thiol (sulfhydryl) group that is able to reduce free radicals. It is the mightyGlutathione that binds to rogueacetaldehyde, metabolizing the molecules to acetic acid for elimination.

As a primer to alcohol consumption, N-acetyl-Cysteine primes the body with sufficient glutathione antioxidants and helps fight off the damaging effects of ethanol as it is being consumed (though not the actual intoxication). As a hangover remedy,acetaldehyde continues to be produced in the body well after you’ve stopped drinking, and taking N-acetyl-Cysteine helps here to produce the necessary glutathione to combat the continued presence of acetaldehyde.

Benefits after abstinence include a further promotion of detoxification in the liver and as a free radical combating oxidative stress. It may further be helpful with complications such as HIV infection, cancer, heart disease, cigarette smoking,chemotherapy, cocaine addiction and dependence and is used in hospitals as an emergency antidote to acetaminophen poisoning.

Again, I’m a beer lover not a doctor, so consult your physician before starting any liver detox or treatments. Multiple readings suggest dosing N-acetyl-Cystein with a vitamin C dose three times that of N-acetyl-Cystein, so ask your doctor.

References: Busnel RG and Lehman AG, Behavioral Brain Research 351-6, 1980.Sprince H et al., Protectants against acetaldehydetoxicity: Sulfhydryl compounds and ascorbic acid. Fed Proc 33(3) (Part 1): March 1974. See also: Sprince H et al., Agents and Actions 5(2): 164-73, 1975 and Sprince H et al., Intl J Vit Nutr Res 47 (Supplement 1G): 185-212, 1977. – Clin Ther. 2005 Mar;27(3):336-41. – Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Mar 30;31(2):389-94. Mardikian PN, LaRowe SD, Hedden S, Kalivas PW, Malcolm RJ. Center for Drug and Alcohol Programs, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 67 President Street, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. – Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Mar 30;31(2):389-94. Mardikian PN, LaRowe SD, Hedden S, Kalivas PW, Malcolm RJ. Center for Drug and Alcohol Programs, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 67 President Street, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.

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